Business Operations

Pro Closer or Faux Closer?

Here are five examples

Many sellers are uncomfortable asking for the order.  They know they are supposed to so they “ask” for it with an “I-don’t-mean-to-bother-you-and-please-don’t-get-mad-at-me” tone and in fact don’t ask for the business at all because they “faux close;” it’s close to a close, but it’s a side-step or a beat-around-the-bush call with too many words. Whatever it is isn’t a close and produces poor treatment and results.

Here are five examples of faux closes:

The Run-Through

Seller: “So, John, we’ve got a great deal on those studs, you should really think about picking those up (no pause) and we have some 2×10 Select Struc that gets into you at $350 which is also a good deal and then…”

Buyer: “Hey, Pete, thanks SO much for the information.  I’ll look it over and get back to you.”

Seller: “OK, great.”

Solution: Make “closing” a separate “thing.” Do not run it together with the rest of the sentence. Stop and ask directly for the item, one item at a time.

Seller: “So, John, we’ve got a great deal on those studs. You should really think about picking those up. Can I sign you up for two?” Then on to the 2×10 Select Stuc and the same, stopping at each item in the list.

 

The Whadya Think?

Seller: “Hi Susan, I’ve got a great price on a car of 2×10 14’s I can get into at $750/MBF Wadya-Think?”

Solution: NEVER ask “Whadya think?” again!—please. It projects a lack of expertise and weakness.

Seller: “Hi, Susan. I’ve got a great price on a car of 2×10 14’s I can get into at $750/MBF, which is a fantastic deal. What’s your order number on that?”

 

The Positive Run Down (with No Ask)

Seller: “Hi, Justin. This is a great car because: (1) $450 is a smokin’ price. (2) You love this stock. (3) The market is moving.” Then silence… which buyer fills with:

Buyer: “Sound good; I’ll let you know.”

Solution: The “List the Benefits” close is powerful. We just need to put the closing hook on it.

Seller: “Hi, Justin. This is a great car because: (1) $450 is a smokin’ price. (2) You love this stock. (3) The market is moving. So how many can you use?”

 

The You Oughta Think About

Seller: “Terry, great news. I was able to find that 1×12 Premium we’ve been looking for. It gets into you at $850/MBF. You oughta think about bringing that in; it’s a great deal.”

Buyer: “OK. Thanks, Bob. I’ll think about it.” (Since this is exactly what the seller told them to do!)

Solution: There is nothing wrong with a softer approach as long as we follow it up with a true ask (close).

Seller: “Terry, great news. I was able to find that 1×12 Premium we’ve been looking for. It gets into you at $850/MBF. We oughta think about bringing that in; it’s a great deal. Give me your order number so we can lock this down before it disappears.”

 

The Give Details (without Adjectives) & Then Be Silent

Seller: “Sheri, I’ve got a car of studs I can get into you at $450/MBF.”

Buyer: “OK. I’ll let you know.”

Solution: All these faux closes are poor, but this is sadly the most common example of faux closing and the worst, laziest, most unprofessional call sellers make. These sellers get treated poorly because they give poor, unimaginative, boring effort and the customer knows it! In their defense, some sellers aren’t lazy, they don’t know any better; but that fact won’t keep customers from treating them poorly.

Faux closes are bad for four reasons:

  1. They send the message that we don’t REALLY want the business, but that we KINDA want it—that’s why we KINDA asked for it, right?
  2. They send the message that we are tentative or unsure. If WE are unsure, the customer will definitely feel unsure.
  3. They’re easy to say no to.
  4. Most importantly, they are by definition disingenuous and false. They send the message that we would kinda-maybe-possibly want the business when the truth is that we do want the business.

 

James Olsen

James Olsen is the founder of Reality Sales Training, Portland, Or. After 20 years in sales with Nike, North Pacific Lumber, and Forest City Trading, in 2001 James started his own sales training business, devoted to helping companies and individuals achieve rapid sales growth. Contact him at (503) 544-3572 or james@realitysalestraining.com.

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